COREY MITCHEL'S MILES FROM NOWHERE WAS MEANT FOR TELEVISION, BUT IS BETTER AS A GRAPHIC NOVEL

Padraig Cotter

The small town of Nowhere, New Mexico, is about to get very unwelcome visitors when an alien prisoner transport crashes there, unleashing a flood of the universe's most dangerous creatures, and it's up to a mismatched cop and alien to stop them. That's the high-concept idea behind writer Corey Mitchel's (G.I. Joe: Frontline) action-packed new comic Miles From Nowhere.

Mitchel spoke with SYFY WIRE about the origins of the project, it's original iteration as a TV show and if John Carpenter is really as cool as he appears.

Could you give us the quick pitch on Miles From Nowhere?

Miles from Nowhere is the story about an alien prison transport crashing on Earth, and the lone surviving alien marshal and a human cop teaming up to keep the most dangerous criminal in the universe from fleeing the planet, which could ultimately lead to the destruction of Earth.

How did the concept come to you?

I had pitched a story about an interstellar police force years before (think Season 1 of True Detective set in the Star Wars universe), but the idea was deemed too expensive, so I tried to figure out how to make it more contemporary. Then one night I was flipping through the channels in bed and The Fugitive came on just as the bus transporting Richard Kimble crashed, and that's when it hit me. What if that bus was an alien prison transport and the Tommy Lee Jones character was the last surviving alien cop on board? And hence, the concept for MFN began to form.

You originally developed Miles from Nowhere as a television series with John Carpenter. Can you tell us more about that iteration of the project?

The whole development process was very brief. Basically, I pitched the idea for Miles from Nowhere to John. He liked it and wanted to move forward. From there, we met with Brian and Lisa Henson who also liked the idea and wanted to move forward. However, before we were able to pitch to the networks, like many projects in Hollywood, it never got off the ground due to events unrelated to the story. But on the plus side, it ultimately led to the Miles From Nowhere book.

Would John have directed any of the episodes had the show moved ahead?

That was the idea at the time, at least the pilot anyway.